James R. Shevock

  • Research Associate
  • Botany

My research interests currently are focused on moss floristics of western North America and China. My field work shifted around 1997 from flowering plants to bryophytes with an emphasis in bryogeography and floristics. Nine plant species have been named in my honor including three mosses and the moss genus Shevockia. One of my most valuable contributions to science is my set of herbarium specimens currently with over 32,000 numbers obtained from western North America (especially California and Nevada), China, Taiwan, and Korea. All of my flowering plant collections are housed at CAS and for my bryophyte collections, the first set is housed at CAS with many duplicates at MO, NY, and UC. A complete set of my Yunnan Province, China collections reside at E, KUN and MO with many duplicates at H, NY, PE and UC, and a set of my Taiwan collections are at the Taiwan Endemic Species Research Institute, Ji-Ji, Nantou County, Taiwan (TAIE) and also at MO and UC. Ongoing bryological research is focused in the mountainous region of Yunnan Province along the border with Myanmar in the Nu Jiang (Salween) and Irrawaddy river basins.

I received my B.S. (1976) and M.A. (1978) in Botany from California State Univ., Long Beach. Upon graduation, I began my federal career as the botanist/ecologist with the USDA Forest Service, Sequoia National Forest (1979-84). In 1984 I accepted at 2-year assignment approved by the Secretary of Agriculture to assist the California Department of Fish & Game as botanist of its Natural Diversity Database. In 1986, I was then promoted to Regional Botanist for the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region stationed at that time in San Francisco (now Mare Island, Vallejo, CA) where I administered the sensitive and rare plant program across 18 national forests in California. In 1998 I departed the Forest Service for a new opportunity to serve as the Associate Regional Director for Resources, Stewardship & Science for the USDI National Park Service, Pacific West Region, headquartered in San Francisco (now in Oakland, CA). On February 1, 2004 I began my new NPS role as research coordinator at the Californian Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit duty stationed at U.C. Berkeley. I officially retired from federal government service effective January 2, 2009. I have also been a research associate of the Department of Botany, California Academy of Sciences since 1983, and was elected as a Fellow in 2007. I have served as President, Corresponding Secretary and Council Member for the California Botanical Society, Member at Large with the American Bryological and Lichenological Society and as Vice President for Plant Programs with the California Native Plant Society.

Education

B.S. Botany (1976) and M.A. Biology (1978), California State University, Long Beach.
Master’s Thesis: A vascular flora of Lloyd Meadows Basin, Sequoia National Forest, Tulare County, California.

Federal Career with U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service

1978. Began 30+ year federal career with USDA Forest Service. First position was wilderness ranger for the Golden Trout Wilderness.

1979-84. Became the first forest botanist for the Sequoia National Forest.  Developed and administered the botany/ecology program.

1984-86. Served on a special assignment on loan from the Forest Service to the California Department of Fish & Game as staff botanist to the Natural Diversity Data Base. Increased interagency use of this statewide resource.

1986-98. Served as Regional Botanist for the Pacific Southwest Region, USDA Forest Service. Administered the threatened, endangered and sensitive plant program. Developed regional guidelines for forest planning toward natural resources.

1998-2003. Associate Regional Director for Resources Stewardship, Partnerships & Science, National Park Service, Pacific West Region. Provided oversight for cultural and natural resources management across 58 park units within six western states and trust territories in the Pacific.

2004-2008. NPS Research Coordinator, Californian Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit, University of California, Berkeley. Assist national park units in developing collaborative research, technical assistance and educational projects.

2009. Completed federal career and officially retired with 32 years of public service.

Professional Activities

Honorary positions:

Fellow, California Academy of Sciences (2007)

Research Associate, Department of Botany, California Academy of Sciences (1983-present)

Research Associate, University Herbarium, University of California, Berkeley (1996-present)

Science Advisory Council, Center for Plant Conservation, St. Louis, MO (1996-2003)

President, California Botanical Society (1991-92)

Corresponding Secretary, California Botanical Society (1985-89)

Council Member, California Botanical Society (several 3-year terms)

Vice President for Plant Programs, California Native Plant Society (1993-96)

Member-at-Large, American Bryological and Lichenological Society (2003-04)

Rare Plant Scientific Advisory Council, California Native Plant Society (multiple years)

Distinguished Alumnus Award, Los Angeles Pierce College

Scientific accomplishments:

Discovered over 20 vascular plant and six bryophytes in California as new to science.

Have ten plant species named in my honor. Among these are six flowering plants (Allium shevockii, Astragalus shevockii, Eriogonum breedlovei var. shevockii, Heterotheca shevockii, Lomatium shevockii, Mimulus shevockii, and four mosses Orthotrichum shevockii, Plagiothecium shevockii and Schizymenium shevockii) and the moss genus, Shevockia, endemic to Yunnan Province, China is the most recent commemorative recognizing my contribution to bryology.

Published over 50 scientific botanical and plant conservation articles in peer reviewed journals.

Member of plant collecting expedition team to Yunnan Province. Specimens contribute toward the development of the Moss Flora of China Project. Several bryophyte species new for China have been documented through these collecting expeditions.

Affiliations:

American Society of Plant Taxonomists

American Bryological and Lichenological Society

British Bryological Society

California Botanical Society

California Lichen Society

California Native Plant Society

Nevada Native Plant Society

Nordic Bryological Society

Barneby, R.C. and J.R. Shevock. 1987. Astragalus ertterae (Fabaceae), a new species for the southern Sierras Nevada. Aliso 11: 585-588.

Bartel, J.A. and J.R. Shevock 1983. Dudleya calcicola (Crassulaceae), a new species for the southern Sierra Nevada. Madroño 30: 210-216.

_____. 1989. Dudleya cymosa subsp. costafolia (Crassulaceae), a new subspecies from the southern Sierra Nevada, Tulare County, California. Aliso 12: 701-704.

Brinda, J. C., L. R. Stark, J. R. Shevock and J. R. Spence. 2007. An annotated checklist of the bryophytes of Nevada, with notes on collecting history in the state. The Bryologist 110: in press.

Ertter, B. and J.R. Shevock. 1993. Snow-wreath and its relatives in the garden. In Shasta snow-wreath: a new genus for California. Fremontia 22: 10-11.

Fernandez, C., J.R. Shevock, A. N. Glazer, and J. N. Thompson 2006. Cryptic species within a cosmopolitan desiccation-tolerant moss: Grimmia laegivata. Proceedings National Academy of Sciences 103: 637-642.

Heckard, L.R. and J.R. Shevock. 1985. Mimulus norrisii (Scrophulariaceae), a new species from the southern Sierra Nevada. Madroño 32: 179-185.

Kellman, K. and J.R. Shevock. 2006. Notes on Dacryophyllum facifolium Ireland. Evansia 23(2): 36-39.

Millar, C.I., M. Barbour, D. Elliott-Fisk, J.R.Shevock, and W. Woolfenden. 1996. Significant Natural Areas. In: D.C. Erman, ed. Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project. Final Report to Congress, Vol. 2 Assessments and Scientific Basis for Management Options, Chapter 29: 839-853. Davis: Univ. of Calif., Centers for Water and Wildland Resources.

Muñoz, J., J.R. Shevock, and D. Toren. 2002. Grimmia serrana (Bryopsida, Grimmiaceae) a new species from California, U.S.A. Journal of Bryology 24: 143-146.

Norris, D.H and J.R. Shevock. 2004a. Contribution toward a bryoflora of California. I. A specimen-based catalogue of mosses. Madroño 51: 1-131.

______. 2004b. Contribution toward a bryoflora of California. II. A key to the mosses. Madroño 51: 133-269.

_____, J.R. Shevock and B. Goffinet. 2004. Orthotrichum kellmanii (Bryopsida, Orthotrichaceae), a remarkable new species from the central coast of California. The Bryologist 107: 209-214.

Quezel, P. and J.R. Shevock. 1982. Essai de mise en parallele de la zonation altitudinale des structures forestieres de vegetation entre la Californie meridionale et le pourtour mediterraneen. Ecologia Mediterranea.

Reveal, J.L. and J.R. Shevock. 1989. A new variety of Eriogonum prattenianum (Polygonaceae: Eriogonideae) from the southern Sierra Nevada. Phytologia 66: 249-250.

Shevock, J.R. 1976. Rare, endangered, and geographically interesting plants of the Santa Ana Mountains, Cleveland National Forest. Sem. in Phys. Geog., CSU, Long Beach. 14 pp.

_____. 1977. Sensitive plant species for the Sequoia National Forest and adjacent regions. USDA Forest Service, Porterville, CA [with yearly supplements 1978-84].

_____. 1978. Vascular flora of Lloyd Meadows Basin, Sequoia National Forest, Tulare County, California. MS Thesis. CSU, Long Beach.

_____. 1984a. Rediscription and distribution of Muilla coronata (Liliaceae). Aliso 10: 621-627.

_____. 1984b. Distribution of Forsellesia nevadensis (Crossosomataceae) in the southern Sierra Nevada of Kern County, California. Crossosoma 9: 2-5.

_____. 1988a. New, rare and geographically interesting plants along the crest of the southern Sierra Nevada, 161-166. In C.A. Hall, Jr., ed. Plant biology of eastern California. Natural History of the White-Inyo Range Symposium, vol. 2. U.C. White Mountain Research Station, California State University, Los Angeles.

_____.1988b. Native plant diversity and special area designations on the national forests in California. Fremontia 16: 21-27.

_____. 1989. Review of Inventory of rare and endangered vascular plants of California (4th ed.) by J.P. Smith and K. Berg. Fremontia 16: 30-31.

_____. 1990. Noteworthy collections from California (new occurrences for vascular plants from the Sierra Nevada). Madroño 37: 62-64.

_____. 1993a. Aceraceae. In J. Hickman, ed. Jepson Manual, higher plants of California. U.C. Press, Berkeley.

_____. 1993b. Cornaceae. In J. Hickman, ed. Jepson Manual, higher plants of California. U.C. Press, Berkeley.

_____. 1993c. Crossosomataceae. In J. Hickman, ed. Jepson Manual, higher plants of California. U.C. Press, Berkeley.

_____. 1993d. Myricaceae. In J. Hickman, ed. Jepson Manual, higher plants of California. U.C. Press, Berkeley.

_____. 1993e. Rutaceae. In J. Hickman, ed. Jepson Manual, higher plants of California. U.C. Press, Berkeley.

_____. 1993f. Staphyleaceae. In J. Hickman, ed. Jepson Manual, higher plants of California. U.C. Press, Berkeley.

_____. 1993g. Styracaceae. In J. Hickman, ed. Jepson Manual, higher plants of California. U.C. Press, Berkeley.

_____. 1993h. How plants get their names and why the names sometimes change. Fremontia 22: 19-24.

_____. 1993i. How rare is the Shasta snow-wreath? In: Shasta snow-wreath: a new genus for California. Fremontia 22: 7-10.

_____. 1995. Overview of the USDA Forest Service. Madroño 42: 251-255.

_____. 1996a. Status of rare and endemic plants. In: D.C. Erman, ed. Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project. Final Report to Congress, Vol. 2 Assessments and Scientific Basis for Management Options, Chapter 24: 691-707. Davis: Univ. of Calif., Centers for Water and Wildland Resources.

_____. 1996b. Plant diversity in the Kern River Region. Field Notes. Kern Res.Center 5(4): 1, 3.

_____. 1997. Alpine and alpine-like plants in the southern Sierra Nevada. In B.C. O’Brien, L.C. Fuentes and L.F. Newcombe, eds. Symposium Proceedings. Out of the wild and into the garden. California’s horticulturally significant plants. April 30-May 2, 1992. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden Occasional Paper No. 1. Claremont, CA.

_____. 1998. Bryophytes: little forests among the trees. Fremontia 26: 3-8.

_____. 2000. Two mosses new to North America with Southern Hemisphere affinities. Evansia 17: 97-98.

_____. 2002a. Bryophytes: the miniature forests overlooked across Nevada. Nevada Native Plant Society Bulletin 28(2): 5-9.

_____. 2002b. Review. Field guide to liverwort genera of Pacific North America. Madroño 49: 298.

_____. 2003a (2004). Moss floristics and geography in California. Fremontia 31:10-17.

_____. 2003b. An update on the Nevada bryophyte inventory. Nevada Native Plant Society Newsletter 29(1): 7.

_____. 2004. Nevada bryophyte inventory update report. Nevada Native Plant Society Newsletter 30(3): 3-5.

_____. 2005a. Bryoxiphium norvegium (Bridel) Mitten subsp. japonicum (Berggren) Löve & Löve (Bryoxiphiaceae), a moss genus and family reported new for Yunnan Province. Acta Botanica Yunnanica 27: 383-384.

_____. 2005b. Seeking funding opportunities for bryophyte and lichen inventories. Evansia 22: 150-153.

_____. 2006. Dedication- Daniel H. Norris. Madroño 53: 417.

_____. 2007. New monograph of a Racomitrium segregate (review). The Bryologist 110: 130-132.

_____ and L. Constance. 1979. A new species of Oreonana, a genus of snowadapted Umbelliferae. Madroño 26: 128-134.

_____ and L. L. Norris. 1981. The mountain parsleys of California. Fremontia 9: 22-25.

_____ and D. W. Taylor 1987. Plant explorations in California, the frontier is still here. Pp. 91-98. In T.S. Elias, ed. Rare and endangered plants, their conservation and management. Symposium Proceedings. California Native Plant Society, Sacramento.

_____ and L. Hennessy 1987. The California Natural Diversity Data Base; a common denominator. Pp 181-184. In T.S. Elias, ed. Rare and endangered plants, their conservation and management. Symposium Proceedings. California Native Plant Society, Sacramento.

_____, B. Ertter, and J. D. Jokerst 1989. Monardella beneolens (Lamiaceae), a new species from the crest of the southern Sierra Nevada, California. Madroño 36:271-279.

_____, J. A. Bartel, and G. Allen. 1990. Distribution, ecology and taxonomy of Erythronium (Liliaceae) from the Sierra Nevada of California. Madroño 37: 261-273.

_____ and G. Allen. 1991. A new variety of Erythronium citrinum (Liliaceae) from the Scott Mountains of Northwest California. Phytologia 71: 101-103.

_____, B. Ertter, and D. W. Taylor. 1992. Neviusia cliftonii (Rosaceae: Kerrieae), an interesting new relict species from California. Novon 2: 285-289.

_____ and D. Toren 2001. A catalogue of mosses for the City and County of San Francisco, California. Madroño 48: 1-16.

______ and A. J. Shaw. 2005. Pohlia robertsonii and P. rabunbaldensis (Bryopsida, Mniaceae), two new species from western and eastern United States. The Bryologist 108: 177-182.

_____, J. R. Spence, and L. R. Stark. 2005. Contributions toward a bryoflora of Nevada: bryophytes new for the Silver State. Madroño 52: 66-71.

_____ and N. G. Slack. 2005. Bruchia bolanderi Lesquereux (Bruchiaceae), species and family new for the Utah bryoflora. Evansia 22: 1-5.

_____, R. Ochyra, and W. R. Buck. 2006. Observations on the ecology and distribution of Hydrocryphaea wardii, a southeast Asian monospecific genus,
reported new for China from Yunnan Province. J. Hattori Botanical Laboratory 100:407-418.

_____ and L. R. Stark. 2007. Bryoflora of Nevada project update. Nevada Native Plant Society Newsletter 33 (5): 3-5.

_____, D. H. Norris and A. J. Shaw. 2008 [2009]. Identification, distribution and family placement of the pleurocarpous moss Bestia longipes. Madroño 55(4) in press.

Skinner, M. W., D. P. Tibor, R. L. Bittman, B. Ertter, T. S. Ross, S. Boyd, A. C.Sanders, J.R. Shevock, and D. W. Taylor. 1995. Research needs for conserving California’s rare plants. Madroño 42: 211-241.

Spence, J. R., L. R. Stark, and J.R. Shevock. 2006. Contributions toward a bryoflora of Nevada., II:bryophytes new for the Silver State. Madroño 53:400-403.

York, D., J.R. Shevock, and J. C. Semple. 1996. Heterotheca monarchensis. In J.C. Semple. A revision of Heterotheca sect. Phyllotheca (Nutt.) Harms (Composite:Astereae). Univ. of Waterloo Biology Series No. 37. 164 pps.

Major bryological works in preparation

New species of mosses for California to be co-authored with Dr. Dan Norris (ongoing)

A bryoflora of Death Valley National Park co-authored with Dana York

A bryoflora of mountain ranges in the Mojave Desert, California co-authored with Eve Laeger

A bryoflora of Yosemite National Park, central Sierra Nevada co-authored with Alison Colwell

A specimen based catalogue of Nevada mosses co-authored by Drs. Lloyd Stark, John Spence and John Brinda

Bryophytes new to Yunnan Province and to the People’s Republic of China. Outcome of field collecting based on the Gaoligongshan Expeditions to China. (est.publication dates periodically as specimens are identified) in collaboration with Dr. David Long, Royal Botanic Garden, Eduinburgh).

Contact

  • James R. Shevock
  • Research Associate
  • California Academy of Sciences
  • 55 Music Concourse Drive
  • San Francisco, CA 94118
  • 415-379-5393 (direct)