Buprestidea (metallic wood borers)

 

There were five specimens of Buprestidae collected on this expedition.  According to William Ericson, the three elongate, narrow, black specimens are Agrilus.  This is a very large genus of several hundred species and the specimens cannot be determined beyond genus at this time.

 

There is one specimen that is short, broad, black, with abundant short, white hairs all over the dorsal surface of the body.  The head appears to be retracted under the thorax and cannot be seen from above.  According to William, this is the genus Habroboma, or one of the closely related genera.

 

The final specimen is small (about 5 mm) and of medium width, and shiny blue with small black pits all over the dorsal surface of the body.  William has identified this specimen as belonging to the tribe Coraebini, but cannot be identified further at this time.

 

 

 

 

Chrysomelidae (leaf beetles, flea beetles)

 

There is at least one specimen of this family in the collected material that has a most unusual structure.  The third through seventh antennal segments are greatly swollen.  At the tip of the seventh segment is a large hook.  It is widely reported that beetles don’t have musculature beyond the first two segments, but this species certainly appears to have musculature in segments 3-7.  The purpose of the large hook is unclear, but quite probably is used for mating.

 

 

 

 

Curculionidae (weevils)

 

During the initial sorting of material, two species of weevils were noted as striking for their coloration.  One small weevil had roughed surface of the body and scales covering the whole body, including legs and antennae.  The scales vary from pale red to white, but in some subdued lights the pinkish scales change to a bright ruby red.

 

The other weevil species is larger and has a black body with isolated patches of red, white, and blue scales on the elytra.  It has a collar of white scales on the posterior surface of the head, and as with the other weevil, the red coloration of the scales can be intensified in certain lights.