Vertebrate Zoology and Anthropology

  • Expeditions

    Learn about the Philippine Biodiversity Expedition
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  • Seafood Watch

    Project

    The catch to the catch of the day.
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  • Galapagos Tortoise Collection

    History

    Collecting herpetological specimens since 1853.
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  • Catalog of Fishes

    Research

    Search the Catalog of Fishes.
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Welcome to the Department of Vertebrate Zoology & Anthropology. Our department undertakes research in the study of human evolution and cultural diversity (Anthropology), amphibians and reptiles (Herpetology), fishes (Aquatic Biology, Ichthyology), and birds and mammals (Ornithology and Mammalogy). The Department is organized into five sections. For more information on those areas, including collections information, research expeditions, and instructions for researchers wishing to visit or borrow specimens from the collections, please see the appropriate departmental section web site.

News

Front Cover Hearst Publication

CAS Special Publication: The Coral Triangle - The 2011 Hearst Philippine Biodiversity Expedition

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The old saying “You are what you eat” takes on new significance in the most comprehensive analysis to date of early human teeth from Africa.

Our ancestors used to dine almost exclusively on leaves and fruits from trees, shrubs and herbs until 3.5mya when a major shift occurred, according to four new simultaneously published studies.

A series of 4 scientific papers shows evidence of an expanding variety of plant foods, written into the enamel of fossil teeth.

Zeresenay Alemseged and others study diet via powder from fossilized hominid teeth.

New studies show that human ancestors expanded their menu 3.5 million years ago.

A chaque nouvelle découverte, elle peut réécrire notre histoire.

Four new studies have taken a new look at the diets of our ancestors and have found their behavior a "game changer."

Biodiversity Workshop Poster

Three researchers from the Department of Invertebrate Zoology and Geology (Terry Gosliner, Chrissy Piotrowski, and Gary Williams) presented lectures and participated in the 2012...

Researchers have found evidence that hominins - early human ancestors - used stone tools to cleave meat from animal bones more than 3.2 million years ago.